Am Museum of Natural History

Official Instagram page of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City

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https://goo.gl/2WBZh2

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A group of meerkats (Suricata suricatta) is called a mob—try and stay cool the next time you come across one. These carnivorous animals are a part of the mongoose family and mainly prey on insects but also on birds, reptiles, or small mammals should the opportunity arise. They tolerate some types of venom, allowing them to eat certain scorpions and snakes. Oh, and those black rings around their eyes? Those are built-in sunglasses that help keep the sun’s glare at bay. Photo: Barni1

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This succulent, called Lithops and commonly known as a “living stone,” is not your typical plant: it blends in with surrounding rocks to avoid being eaten. Native to southern Africa, its leaves sit beneath the ground while a translucent surface “leaf window” allows in sunlight for photosynthesis. Yellow or white flowers eventually emerge from the center, once the pebble-like leaves have fully matured. Photo: yellowcloud

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Did you know all dogs evolved from wolves as a result of multiple domestication events that took place at least 15,000 years ago? Wolves have the widest natural range of any land mammal other than humans and once occupied most of the Northern Hemisphere. They have evolved with humans over time, both as workmates and companions. You can share this fact about the origins of man’s best friend as we head into the Year of the Dog this Lunar New Year! Photo: AMNH/R. Mickens

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Can you imagine seeing one of these wiggle past you on land? As unusual as they look, giant mudskippers (Periophthalmodon schlosseri) are fairly common in parts of Southeast Asia. Often found on muddy shores near mangrove forests, these strange fish live in water-filled burrows in the mud. They need to breathe air, so they hang out on land, using their pectoral fins to “skip” or “walk” across mudflats. Photo: Bernard Dupont

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Let the Wilson’s bird-of-paradise (Cicinnurus respublica) make you swoon this Valentine’s Day with a very special song and dance. Males are known for their striking yellow cape, crimson back, turquoise crown, green breast, and spiraling tail feathers. In order to attract a mate, a male sets up an “arena,” clearing out leaf litter and other distracting items. Once a female arrives, the male starts a complex courtship display that involves song, dance, and showing off its vibrant breast shield. Seeking an organized and charming partner is something we all have in common! Photo: Serhanoksay

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In celebration of Fat Tuesday, meet the stout African bullfrog (Pyxicephalus adspersus). These amphibians can grow up to 8 inches in diameter and will eat almost anything that moves! When the rains arrives in sub-Saharan Africa, the bullfrogs emerges from underground to eat and mate. Females lay up to 4,000 eggs that hatch and develop into froglets 18 days later. The male’s job? He guards the tadpoles, which swim around him for protection. But while protecting his young—he also feeds on them. Photo: Kelley Minars

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Happy 209th birthday, Charles Darwin! Two centuries after his birth, nearly everyone knows his name. Keenly observing nature in all its forms—from fossil sloths to mockingbirds, primroses to children—Darwin saw that we all are related. Every living thing shares an ancestry, he concluded, and the vast diversity of life on Earth results from processes at work over millions of years and still at work today. Darwin's explanation for this great unfolding of life through time–the theory of evolution by natural selection–transformed our understanding of the living world.

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What bird is green, flightless, and native to New Zealand? If you guessed the Kakapo, you are correct! The Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus) is the heaviest parrot in the world, weighing in at up to 8 pounds. Instead of using wings for flying, this species—also the only flightless parrot in the world—uses them for balance while running or climbing trees. Once very common to New Zealand’s islands, the Kakapo is now considered critically endangered, its population diminished by invasive species and habitat reduction that accompanied human settlement. Photo: jidanchaomian

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Not sure what you’re looking at? It’s all part of the leafy sea dragon’s (Phycodurus eques) camouflage to mirror kelp or seaweed. Like seahorse males, sea dragon dads are the ones to carry the developing offspring, up to 100-250 fertilized embryos. But while seahorses have a pouch, sea dragons tuck their precious cargo under their tails into “eggcups” that hold one egg each, nourishing it with oxygen until hatching day. Leafy sea dragons are found around the southern coast of Australia. Photo: Togabi

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Did you know the white tiger is the official mascot of the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games? White tigers aren't a separate species, nor are they albino—they are actually Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) who carry a recessive gene that that affects coat color. Wishing the best of luck to all participants! Photo: SusuMa

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What’s in a dino name? The first Citipati osmolskae specimens (model, pictured) were discovered by scientists from the American Museum of Natural History and the Mongolian Academy of Sciences in 1993 at Ukhaa Tolgod, Mongolia. In traditional Himalayan Buddhism, Citipati are the dancing skeletons that guard funeral pyres. The name osmolskae honors Halszka Osmólska, a Polish paleontologist who specialized in dinosaurs. She was a great explorer of the Gobi Desert. Photo: AMNH/R. Mickens

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If the colors of the Peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus) don’t take your breath away, their “punch” will! This critter has one of the fastest recorded punches of any living animal, clocking in at 50 miles per hour to crush the shells of their prey. Beyond their powerful punch, they also have some of the most advanced eyes, with the ability to process ultraviolet, infrared, and polarized light. They are native to the warm waters of the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Photo: prilfish

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SpaceX successfully launched the world’s most powerful rocket into space this afternoon! The 23-story Falcon Heavy Rocket took off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 3:45 pm EST. With 27 engines, this spacecraft can lift nearly 141,000 pounds into orbit. According to SpaceX, the Falcon Heavy was designed to eventually carry humans into space and to restore “the possibility of flying missions with crew to the Moon or Mars.” Photo: SpaceX

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The sky is blue, grass is green, and blood is red. Right? Wrong! Blood can be green, clear, violet, or...blue, like in horseshoe crabs. In these critters, the oxygen-carrying molecule contains metal copper, which has a bluish tint. Horseshoe crab blood also clots in the presence of certain disease-causing bacteria, so manufacturers test drugs with it to make sure their products aren’t contaminated. If you’ve been vaccinated against measles, mumps, and smallpox, you can thank a horseshoe crab. Photo: Brian Gratwicke

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Would you be okay with the Cook Strait giant weta (Deinacrida rugosa) crawling around on your arm? This insect, found on islands off the coast of New Zealand, typically feeds on plants and is considered docile. There are 11 species of giant weta, a nocturnal group known for their large size and weight—when fully grown, some of these insects can be heavier than a mouse! Through conservation efforts in 2007, the Cook Strait species was reintroduced to New Zealand’s mainland, where it had been extinct for 100 years, and can be found in the Zealandia Wildlife Sanctuary. Photo: Sid Mosdell

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Buried in the mud at the bottom of a frozen lake, hibernating painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) survive for four or five months without oxygen. One reason they can do it: their calcified shells neutralize a tissue-damaging substance—lactic acid—generated when energy is produced without oxygen. When the weather turns warm, you might spot a group of painted turtles on a log, basking in the Sun. This behavior helps these cold-blooded animals thermoregulate, The Sun also dries out and kills parasitic leeches.

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It’s Friday, and this juvenile southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) looks pretty excited about it. The males of this species are known for their large trunk-like proboscises—hence, their common name. These mammals spend about 10 months out of the year in the open ocean, but mate and give birth on land. The juvenile pictured was photographed in South Georgia, an island in the south Atlantic Ocean that’s home to more than half of the entire species of southern elephant seals. Their smaller cousins, the northern elephant seals, can be found off the coasts of California, Mexico, and Alaska. Photo: Serge Ouachée

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Velella velella is a natural sailor, and goes wherever the wind may blow. You can typically find these Cnidarians surfing the warm oceans by catching the breeze on the stiff sail on their backs. On the underside of the velella’s disk-like body are tentacles laced with stinging cells that help it catch its next meal, which might include fish larvae or zooplankton. Photo: Wilson44691

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It’s the unicorn of insects! This species of planthopper (Pyrops candelaria) is easy to recognize thanks to its long proboscis, which it uses like a straw to feed on sap behind tree bark. Sometimes called a “lanternfly” or “lantern bug,” this insect does not actually emit any light. Like other planthoppers in the superfamily Fulgoroidea, the antennae on this critter can be found on its “cheeks” below the eyes. Photo: Richard Ling

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There’s no place like home! African termites (Macrotermes michaelseni) build towering mounds that are typically 10 feet tall, but can reach 30 feet. Underground, up to a million termites live in tunnels, farming fungus for food. The colony consumes as much oxygen as a cow. To get that much oxygen down to their lairs, the termites build huge chimney-like mounds laced with tunnels to funnel air underground. Photo: Rod Waddington

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The Rufous Hornbill (Buceros hydrocorax) is indigenous to the Philippines and characterized, like all hornbills, by a prominent casque or horny growth extending along the top of its head. Known locally as the Kalaw, this bird’s headgear is made of keratin—the same protein that makes up fingernails and hoofs. According to Malaysian legend, spoons and buttons made from the large bird’s beak would change color in the presence of poison. Today, trade in carved hornbill objects is restricted and this species is protected under the United Nations’ Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. Photo: Olaf Oliviero Riemer

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You may think this animal’s bangs need a trim, but he’ll take all the hair he can get! Meet the highland cow or “coo” as this mammal is frequently called in its native country of Scotland. This breed of domestic cattle (Bos taurus) is known for its long horns and shaggy coat, which helps to combat harsh weather during rainy and cold winters in the Scottish Highlands. This bovine holds the title for being the oldest registered breed of cattle and can munch on up to 150 pounds of grass each day! Photo: Pixabay

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The best weapon is one you don’t have to use—just showing it off keeps enemies away. For instance, the water moccasin—also called the cottonmouth—only has to open its jaws, and most enemies back off. Like the deep black mouth of the African mamba, the moccasin’s bright white mouth makes it instantly recognizable and warns of its poisonous bite. Scientists call this kind of warning aposematism, which means “signal from a distance.” Photo: Geoff Gallice

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With an average gestation of about 20 days, female lemmings may produce more than 100 offspring in six months. Baby lemmings are particularly immature at birth, much like marsupial babies; they have eyes and ears that haven’t opened and no fur. But young lemmings grow up fast: females sometimes become pregnant just 14 days after birth! Photo: Andreaze

Am Museum of Natural History Name Data

Am Museum of Natural History Data Details
Am Museum of Natural History full length: 28 characters (28 bytes)
Unique part(s): Am Museum of Natural History
Am Museum of Natural History Name Volwes: Aueuoauaio (10 characters)
Am Museum of Natural History Name Consonants: m Msm f Ntrl Hstry (18 characters)

Am Museum of Natural History user Name Encoding

  • 11000111000100001100110001110 Decimal name:
  • 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 Binary name:
  • 65 109 32 77 117 115 101 117 109 32 111 102 32 78 97 116 117 114 97 108 32 72 105 115 116 111 114 121 ASCII name:
  • 416d204d757365756d206f66204e61747572616c20486973746f7279 HEX name:
  • 19ed778c262310696f574e88bfc89b6f MD5 Encoding:
  • 65093a51fe0b26cd9c9716df4d1d0912449d8084 SHA1 Encoding:
  • AMMSMFNTRLHSTR Metaphone name:
  • A525 Name Soundex:
  • QW0gTXVzZXVtIG9mIE5hdHVyYWwgSGlzdG9yeQ== Base64 Encoding:
  • yrotsiH larutaN fo muesuM mA Reverse name:

Am Museum of Natural History user name Nato Encoding

Letter Code Word U.S. Army standard ICAO and ITU Roman standard FAA standards ICAO IPA standard SIO (France) ICAO recording (1955) Consolidated transcription
A Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
m Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
M Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
s Sierra see AIR ah SEE AIR RAH SEEAIRAH or SEE-AIR-AH siˈerɑ si èr rah [siˈɛɾʌ] /siːˈɛrɑː/ see-ERR-ah
e Echo EKK oh ECK OH ECKOH or ECK-OH ˈeko èk o [ˈɛkoʊ] /ˈɛkoʊ/
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
m Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
o Oscar OSS car OSS CAH OSS-SCAR or OSS-CAR ˈɔskɑ oss kar [ˈɑskɹ̩] /ˈɒskɑː/ OS-kah
f Foxtrot FOKS trot FOKS TROT FOKSTROT or FOKS-TROT ˈfɔkstrɔt fox trott [ˈfɑkstrɑt] /ˈfɒkstrɒt/ FOKS-trot
N November NOH vem ber NO VEM BER NOVEMBER or NO-VEM-BER noˈvembə no vèmm ber [noʊˈvɛmbɹ̩] /noʊˈvɛmbər/ noh-VEM-bər
a Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
t Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
r Romeo ROW me oh ROW ME OH ROWME OH or ROW-ME-OH ˈroːmiˑo ro mi o [ˈɹoʊmi.oʊ] /ˈroʊmiːoʊ/ ROH-mee-oh
a Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
l Lima LEE mah LEE MAH LEEMAH or LEE-MAH ˈliːmɑ li mah [ˈlimʌ] /ˈliːmɑː/ LEE-mah
H Hotel HO tell HOH TELL HOHTELL or HOH-TELL hoːˈtel ho tèll [hoʊˈtɛl] /hoʊˈtɛl/ hoh-TEL
i India IN dee ah IN DEE AH INDEE AH or IN-DEE-AH ˈindiˑɑ in di ah [ˈɪndi.ʌ] /ˈɪndiːɑː/ IN-dee-ah
s Sierra see AIR ah SEE AIR RAH SEEAIRAH or SEE-AIR-AH siˈerɑ si èr rah [siˈɛɾʌ] /siːˈɛrɑː/ see-ERR-ah
t Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
o Oscar OSS car OSS CAH OSS-SCAR or OSS-CAR ˈɔskɑ oss kar [ˈɑskɹ̩] /ˈɒskɑː/ OS-kah
r Romeo ROW me oh ROW ME OH ROWME OH or ROW-ME-OH ˈroːmiˑo ro mi o [ˈɹoʊmi.oʊ] /ˈroʊmiːoʊ/ ROH-mee-oh
y Yankee YANG kee YANG KEY YANGKEY or YANG-KEY ˈjænki yang ki [ˈjæŋki] /ˈjæŋkiː/ YANG-kee

Am Museum of Natural History Linguistics

Language In Local
Am Museum of Natural History with Greek letters Ἀμ Μυσευμ ὀφ Νατυραλ Ἱστορυ
Am Museum of Natural History with Hindi letters अम् मुसॆउम् ऒफ़् नतुरल् हिस्तॊर्य्
Am Museum of Natural History with Chinese letters Aㄇ˙ Mㄨ˙ㄙㄜ˙ㄨ˙ㄇ˙ ㄛ˙ㄈ Nㄚ˙ㄊㄨ˙ㄖㄚ˙ㄌ Hㄧ˙ㄙㄊㄛ˙ㄖy
Am Museum of Natural History with Cyrillic letters Ам Мусеум оф Натурал Хисторы
Am Museum of Natural History with Hebrew letters ַם מֻסֶֻם ֳף נַטֻרַל הִסטֳרי
Am Museum of Natural History with Arabic letters َم مُسُِم ُف نَتُرَل هِستُري
Am Museum of Natural History with Tamil letters அம் முஸெஉம் ஒப் நதுரல் ஹிஸ்தொர்ய்
Am Museum of Natural History with Japanese letters あむ むせうむ おふ なてぅらる ひすとるい
Am Museum of Natural History with Armenian letters Ամ Մուսեում ոֆ Նատուրալ Հիստորյ

Am Museum of Natural History ratings of this name

A Good Name 76%
24% A Bad Name
Masculine 0%
100% Feminine
Classic 30%
70% Modern
Mature 26%
74% Youthful
Formal 51%
49% Informal
Upper Class 68%
32% Common
Urban 76%
24% Natural
Wholesome 81%
19% Devious
Strong 52%
48% Delicate
Refined 53%
47% Rough
Strange 7%
93% Boring
Simple 20%
80% Complex
Serious 21%
79% Comedic
Nerdy 16%
84% Unintellectual
Characteristics Value
Am Museum of Natural History's Optimism 13
Am Museum of Natural History's Creativity 1
Am Museum of Natural History's Resilience 11
Am Museum of Natural History's Self-Control 9
Am Museum of Natural History's Emotional Awareness 11
Am Museum of Natural History's Sociability 1
Am Museum of Natural History's Patience 10
Am Museum of Natural History's Integrity 15
Am Museum of Natural History's Willpower 5
Am Museum of Natural History's Passion 13

Post statistic

Created Text Like Comments Hashtags Post value Go
2018.02.19. 16:46 A group of meerkats (Suricata suricatta) is called a mob—try and stay cool the next... 1 515 11 0 4,26$
2018.02.19. 04:29 This succulent, called Lithops and commonly known as a “living stone,” is not your... 3 530 56 0 7,49$
2018.02.17. 04:47 Did you know all dogs evolved from wolves as a result of multiple domestication events... 2 646 22 0 5,00$
2018.02.16. 04:29 Can you imagine seeing one of these wiggle past you on land? As unusual as they look,... 2 450 37 0 5,58$
2018.02.15. 01:02 Let the Wilson’s bird-of-paradise (Cicinnurus respublica) make you swoon this... 2 921 21 0 5,06$
2018.02.14. 03:38 In celebration of Fat Tuesday, meet the stout African bullfrog (Pyxicephalus... 1 297 13 0 4,26$
2018.02.13. 04:53 Happy 209th birthday, Charles Darwin! Two centuries after his birth, nearly everyone... 3 161 27 0 5,48$
2018.02.12. 03:03 What bird is green, flightless, and native to New Zealand? If you guessed the Kakapo,... 4 387 38 0 6,94$
2018.02.11. 02:13 Not sure what you’re looking at? It’s all part of the leafy sea dragon’s (Phycodurus... 2 882 18 0 4,89$
2018.02.10. 01:02 Did you know the white tiger is the official mascot of the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic... 2 196 11 0 4,39$
2018.02.09. 04:19 What’s in a dino name? The first Citipati osmolskae specimens (model, pictured) were... 2 367 15 0 4,59$
2018.02.08. 04:34 If the colors of the Peacock mantis shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus) don’t take your... 2 509 20 0 4,86$
2018.02.07. 05:40 SpaceX successfully launched the world’s most powerful rocket into space this... 2 106 20 0 4,71$
2018.02.06. 05:12 The sky is blue, grass is green, and blood is red. Right? Wrong! Blood can be green,... 4 762 45 0 7,79$
2018.02.05. 05:27 Would you be okay with the Cook Strait giant weta (Deinacrida rugosa) crawling around... 1 906 33 0 5,08$
2018.02.04. 04:44 Buried in the mud at the bottom of a frozen lake, hibernating painted turtles... 2 804 23 0 5,11$
2018.02.03. 03:38 It’s Friday, and this juvenile southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) looks pretty... 4 019 29 0 6,04$
2018.02.02. 02:45 Velella velella is a natural sailor, and goes wherever the wind may blow. You can... 2 009 10 0 4,32$
2018.02.01. 02:40 It’s the unicorn of insects! This species of planthopper (Pyrops candelaria) is easy to... 3 275 34 0 5,95$
2018.01.31. 05:43 There’s no place like home! African termites (Macrotermes michaelseni) build towering... 2 106 10 0 4,34$
2018.01.30. 04:47 The Rufous Hornbill (Buceros hydrocorax) is indigenous to the Philippines and... 2 097 18 0 4,63$
2018.01.29. 03:19 You may think this animal’s bangs need a trim, but he’ll take all the hair he can get!... 4 938 55 0 8,81$
2018.01.28. 05:05 The best weapon is one you don’t have to use—just showing it off keeps enemies away.... 2 307 13 0 4,50$
2018.01.27. 01:45 With an average gestation of about 20 days, female lemmings may produce more than 100... 3 621 51 0 7,26$

Am Museum of Natural History National Statistics for Popularity and Rank

Am Museum of Natural History National Statistic for the Name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Population Estimate 3786 +/- 7.1%
National Rank 36895
Percentile Rank 0.1
Proportion per 100k 0.1
SSA Baby Name Population 840
SSA Baby Name per 100k 0.5
SSA Baby Name Rank 16551
SSA Baby Name Percentile Rank 0.8

Am Museum of Natural History Summary

  • AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is ranked as the 36895th most popular given name in the United States with an estimated population of 3786.
  • This name is in the 10th percentile, this means that nearly 2% of all the first names are more popular.
  • There are 0.1 people named AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY for every 100,000 Americans.
  • Based on the analysis of 100 years worth of data from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Baby Names database, the estimated population of people named AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is 840
  • According to our algorithm there are 270 last names associated with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.

Race and Ethinicity

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Race or Hispanic origin % of population with name % of US general population % difference
White 82.53% 71.96% 10.57 %
Hispanic origin 9.23% 6.76% 2.47%
Black 3.13% 15.76% -12.63%
Asian or Pacific Islander 2.03% 3.36% -1.33%
Two or more races 3.43% 2.76% 0.67%
American Indian or Alaskan Native -0.37% -0.6% 0.23%

Summary

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is 82.53% White, 9.23% Hispanic origin, 3.13% Black, 2.03% Asian or Pacific Islander, 3.43% Two or More Races, and -0.37 American Indian or Alaskan Native. These figures should be considered only as a rough estimate. The purpose of this graph is to compare the name's specific race and Hispanic origin distribution to the distribution in the general population of the US.

The vertical blue bars represent the race distribution of people that have the name. The yellow horizontal lines represent the race distribution of the general population. The amount by which the blue bars extend past the yellow horizontal lines determines how likely a person with the name will be part of a given race or Hispanic origin group.

On this basis, the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY have a higher likelyhood of being White and a lower likelyhood of being Black.

Ethnic and Cultural Name Categories

The first name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is included in the following name catgories:
  • US masculine baby name - Social Security Administration
  • Turkish masculine given name